Jabbado's Kitchen

A Gnome's culinary journey.

Swamp Dragon Ragout – Ragout with Beer-Nettle-Sauce

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on RedditPin on PinterestEmail this to someonePrint this page

Many do not consider the swamp dragon to be actual dragons, because they neither gather a hoarde, nor have they ever been caught terrorising a settlement. They prefer living in peace and seclusion in the swamps of the world. Which is probably why they are being caught and bred to the extend that they are, and why they have become known as a quick and easy dragon dish among humans.

Print

Swamp Dragon Ragout - Ragout with Beer-Nettle-Sauce

Swamp Dragons are the only breed of dragon that can be domesticated with relative ease. In addition to that, you do not need more than the meat of two or three of these shy animals to make this tasty dish.

Course Main Course
Cuisine Human
Servings 4 Humans
Author Jabbado

Ingredients

  • 600 g turkey cutlet
  • 500 g celery
  • 2-3 tbsp. olive oil
  • 500 ml dark beer
  • 2 tbsp. stinging nettle dried
  • 2 tbsp. parsley dried
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 pinch sugar
  • 1 pinch cinnamon
  • 1 tbsp. flour

Instructions

  1. Cut the meat into strips and the celery into thin slices.

  2. Heat up the olive oil in a pan and brown the meat thoroughly.

  3. Take the meat out of the pan and fry the celery.

  4. Deglaze with the dark beer.

  5. Add dried nettle and parsley, stir well, and let simmer for 5 minutes.

  6. Season with salt, sugar and cinamon. Then sprinkle with the flour while stirring constantly to thicken the sauce.

  7. Add the meat and let it heat up.

Recipe Notes

This ragout can be made with any kind of meat, but it is most authentic using turkey.

The beer, too, can be chosen to taste, depending on availiability. And do not worry, the alcohole will evaporate completely, making this safe for children to eat, too.

If you want to, you can replace the olive oil with nettle oil, either bought or home-made (fill a wide-necked bottle loosely with dried nettle leaves and fill it up with good quality olive oil. Close it tight and let it sit for a couple of weeks).

If you want to, you can serve rice or noodles with this.

And a glas dark beer to go along with it cannot hurt, either.

Why Swamp Dragons, if you can hunt something better?

Just like the Street Rat, Swamp Dragon Ragout works as a rather run-of-the-mill dish that is served in many taverns without any relation to dragons. It works well as a base for a discussion between the characters and a potential employer, or for the aftermath of one day and for planning the next one.

It does not take much in terms of skill or bravery to hunt and kill a swamp dragon, since these creatures will neither flee nor defend themselves in any way worth mentioning. Hence, a swamp dragon hunt does not really offer any of the excitement that a modern adventurer has come to expect, and apart from staged “hunts” for tourists, this aspect of the meal is probably notthing to get adventurers hooked.

But on the other hand, maybe swamp dragons at dome point decide not to take this treatment laying down and start to fight back – either on their own or driven by an outside force, like for example an elder dragon enthralling them. Since swamp dragons are widespread as pets, this could result in nasty business and require the intervention of real heroes – and would yield ingredients for a ragout or two..

 

How do you like your swamp dragon?

Bitte lasst mich wissen wie euch und euren Freunden dieses Rezept geschmeckt hat. Mit welchem Fleisch und welchem Bier habt ihr gekocht, und wieso gab es überhaupt Sumpfdrachen? Ich freue mich darauf von euch zu hören!

Tweet about this on TwitterShare on FacebookShare on Google+Share on RedditPin on PinterestEmail this to someonePrint this page

Chose a Category

Loading Facebook Comments ...

1 Comment

Add a Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Jabbado's Kitchen © 2017 Frontier Theme

Feed your Inbox with
every new Recipe!

Subscribe to Jabbados mailing list and get recipes and updates to your email inbox.

Thank you for subscribing!

Something went wrong.